Advantages of Taking a Flex Course

With Flex II classes starting on Oct. 19, I decided to share my experience with flex courses. When I first started college, the idea of a flex class was really scary to me. I had always heard about how fast pace they are and how the workload can be demanding.

For those reasons, I never had the courage to sign up for one. Until this past summer when I had to because there were no other options available. I ended up taking a Texas History Maymester class. It was only five weeks long and to my surprise, one of the best classes I’ve taken at NVC so far! I enjoyed how quickly the course ended and it got me thinking about how convenient courses like this could be for a lot of people, so I compiled a list of advantages that come with taking flex courses.

  • Fast Paced – Due to flex courses being so fast paced, they can help you obtain more credit hours in a short period of time which means you can earn your associate’s degree faster!
  • Affordable – Flex courses are only $99 a credit hour for in-district students.
  • Convenient for Working Parents– Parents are used to a fast-paced life so introducing a flex course wouldn’t be too difficult! Not only are flex courses fast paced they are also most of the time self-paced!
  • Flex Class + Remote Learning – NVC is currently offering a bunch of flex classes remotely starting Oct. 19. This is a huge advantage because not only will the course credits be earned quickly and efficiently but from the comfort of your home!

Check out this link for more info: Fall 2020 Registration & Payment Calendar. Note: Currently enrolled students on financial aid students would likely have to pay out-of-pocket for additional classes taken during the Flex II term.

By NVC Student Haneen Rafati

 

Tips for Successful Remote Learning

In the beginning of each semester, I take time to write down some goals I have for each class. The goals vary from semester to semester and of course from subject to subject. But this semester they have been adjusted to fit my remote learning needs.

Remote learning has been quite the adjustment for many students. A lot of factors go into virtual classes. For example, accessible wifi and devices, appropriate time management and of course integrity. Below I provided a guided list of tips you will need in order to succeed this semester!

  • Wifi and Devices– I know this is not accessible to many people but thankfully NVC offers wifi hotspots and laptop rentals. Providing students with accessibility further increases their ability to perform well in their courses. For more info on wifi hotspots and laptop rental click here: https://www.alamo.edu/nvc/about-us/remote-learning/students/
  • Appropriate Setting- During my Zoom lectures, I prefer to sit at a desk or even on the floor if a desk isn’t available. I refuse to sit on my bed because I am unable to resist the urge to lay down!
  • Join the Zoom class!- Many people dread joining Zoom lectures. To me personally, that’s the easiest part. Attendance is an easy grade and for many professors it’s required.
  • Eliminate Distractions- One of my biggest distractions is my phone so I like to completely detach myself from it. I either put it on my bed while I am on my desk or I leave my phone in another room. It’s dramatic but it works.
  • Manage your time!- After a long day of lectures I just wanna take a nap…and often times I do! As long as I have enough time to complete my homework at night or another day, I allow myself to rest. This is also important in order to avoid burnout. I set reminders on my phone for due dates so I don’t forget what I have to do.

I hope you enjoyed reading my tips and take them into consideration when navigating this strange time! I always enjoy making these because they also serve as a reminder to myself. Remember to stay focused and don’t forget to get up and stretch!

By NVC Student Haneen Rafati

 

Flattening the Curve while Earning a College Degree

On March 13, I packed up my belongings from my work desk at Northwest Vista College. I remember debating on whether or not I should keep a bag of pretzels in my drawer for when I come back to my work study job. I decided against it since they’d probably be stale by the time I got back. Spring break was about to begin and I was so ready for a week off. Little did I know a global pandemic was about to change our lives forever.

I remember receiving the email about the transition to remote classes. I was very skeptical at first thinking it would all be gone in no time and we would be told to go back to campus. About five months into quarantine, that memory is now laughable.

I was nervous to begin remote learning for many reasons. Both my brother and I are college students and we have one laptop that we share. This was a huge inconvenience since we had one class that was at the same exact time. He would use his phone to join his Zoom lecture while I would use the laptop. This went on for a while until I decided to get my own laptop. I am very grateful that I was able to buy myself a laptop. I know many students don’t have that type of privilege and accessibility.

Another fear that I had was not doing well in my courses due to distractions at home. One of the biggest distractions to me is my phone, so I came up with the plan to completely remove my phone from for my sight during Zoom lectures and homework time. It was really effective. I did fairly well in the spring semester and stayed organized despite the challenges.

For this upcoming semester, I want to stay focused and resilient. I think the best trait for humans to have is resilience. Especially in the midst of the chaos in the world. I will continue to do my part in order to flatten the curve while simultaneously earning a college degree. It’s so evident that academics and this pandemic go hand in hand. Without educators and the educated we wouldn’t know anything about COVID-19.

Overall I am glad that my family and I have stayed healthy during this time and I am also grateful for the ability to continue my education from home. And on a brighter note, I am also thankful that I took that bag of pretzels home and saved it from rotting in my desk!

By NVC Student Haneen Rafati

Let’s Keep Dancing, Creating and Learning Together this Fall!!


The Alamo Colleges and Northwest Vista College has determined that remote learning is the best way (right now) for you to keep making progress towards your educational goals while staying safe.

So this fall semester, NVC Dance will offer live interactive studio training with personalized feedback through Zoom, Flipgrid, and a variety of other digital platforms which allow us to keep dancing, creating and learning together remotely.

So, take a remote class in Ballet, Modern, Jazz, Pilates, Improvisation, and/or Dance Performance this Fall

  • Connect with others through dance
  • Dance/learn wherever you are
  • Keep building your skills
  • Keep creating
  • Keep sweating (we promise you will sweat)
  • Keep moving—get back to your body; movement for health
  • Stay home and stay safe
  • Stay strong—Build resilience
  • Keep making progress towards your degree in Dance.  All of the courses below transfer to the dance program at Texas State San Marcos. http://myalamocatalog.alamo.edu/preview_entity.php?catoid=192&ent_oid=4290&returnto=12862

Fall Dance Classes

Technique and conditioning classes   Weekly live interactive group movement sessions as well as personalized one-on-one coaching and feedback via Zoom, Flipgrid and other digital platforms.  Semester concludes with a digital concert; a virtualExtravaDanza.  Technique courses include:

Modern Dance – This semester in Modern Dance we will explore the foundations of movement practice; how developmental movement patters support and inform dance technique.  Create pathways for action and expression through the body with imagery, movement and applied kinesiology. Stretch, spiral, curve, slide, contract/release.  Whatever the size of your at-home dance space you will enjoy a full-bodied movement experience.

Ballet – Dive into the world of ballet by learning the foundational techniques and steps focused on alignment, strength, and grace from the comfort of your home. Remote learning through innovative digital platforms like Zoom and FlipGrid will provide a new, fun way to train in this historic dance form while receiving a sense of community with classmates and individualized feedback to improve technique. There will be a heavy focus on barre (standing and FloorBarre) as well as adagio movement.

Jazz Dance – A survey of Jazz Dance styles, including classical, musical theater and urban forms.    Focus this semester on skills we can build in smaller spaces: turns, balances, extensions, hinges and footwork.

Other studio-based classes:

Improvisation – The art of spontaneity; doodling with movement.    We will meet each week as a class via Zoom for guided movement improvisations, supplemented by in-person (via Zoom) discussions of selected articles on improvisation by artists in the field.   Our focus this semester will be inner resources: the ongoing flow of sensations, ideas, feelings, images which inform our improvisations.   We will also explore ways that we influence and are influenced by each other in movement, with particular attention to the unique opportunities for connection our digital interface provides.   Semester will culminate with each student leading the class in a guided improvisation of her own creation.

Dance Performance – Rise to the challenge of dance performance in the digital world. Gain new perspectives on dance as well as develop a keen sense of creativity, dedication, and collaboration. Participate in innovative choreographic projects by students, faculty and guest artists created with the use of remote platforms like Zoom and FlipGrid. Works created during the semester will be presented in an all-digital concert at the end of the semester.

Pilates –  Support your technical training in dance with core strength and control.   Weekly instruction in Pilates mat work beginning through beginning/intermediate.

Theory courses:

Our lecture-video based classes—Dance Appreciation and World Dance— will also be taught remotely. Think about, read about, talk about dance. Focus is on historical, social and cultural contexts for dance.

Fall payment plan

$21 is all you need to hold your classes for fall! That’s $1 for payment plan, and $20 for the first payment. The rest of the cost is  spread out into manageable payments throughout the semester. To get started on a payment plan select “Enroll in plan” in ACES.

Faculty Advising

We are here to answer all your dance-related questions! For questions about Fall dance classes, the Dance major, and our Transfer Advising Guide (TAG) in Dance with Texas State San Marcos just email Jayne King (jking80@alamo.edu). For questions about the Dance Performance class and the NVC Repertory Dance Ensemble (our virtual student dance company) just email Bittany Lopez blopez128@alamo.edu. We can correspond by email or set up a teleconference if you prefer.

NVC Dance…… your dreams in motion

 

 

Dance

Easier Transition to Engineering Degrees for Students

Northwest Vista College students will now be able to get an easier transition to a bachelor’s degree in Engineering with a new partnership between Alamo Colleges and the The University of Texas at San Antonio.

TATE, which stands for UTSA Transfer Academy for Tomorrow’s Engineers (TATE) program, will allow NVC students to co-enroll at both institutions, and take engineering courses taught by UTSA and NVC faculty. Upon completion of the NVC component of the program, students will continue courses at UTSA to obtain their bachelor’s degree in any of the six UTSA engineering degree programs, which includes Biomedical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, and Civil Engineering.

Qiaoying “Joy” Zhou and Thomas Pressley of NVC’s Math and Engineering department said that through TATE, NVC students will transfer to UTSA as true juniors without missing key courses and key prerequisites. The program was designed for 30 students per cohort.

This new program provides many benefits to students. It makes the transfer process streamlined and gives them an opportunity to earn an associate of science degree at NVC while pursuing a bachelor’s degree. And, it also gives NVC students access to top employers including the U.S. Air Force, Valero Energy, H-E-B, Intel, CPS, USAA, IBM, Accenture, Proctor & Gamble, and more.

Joy and Thomas added this joint admissions program also opens the door for many students who don’t have the resources to an engineering degree. It provides students who are economically disadvantaged with the opportunity to start at Alamo Colleges at low cost (or no cost through AlamoPromise) while still being able to keep pace with their UTSA counterparts and graduate with a bachelors in engineering in four years total.

Additionally, students who are not mathematically prepared to start a university engineering program in calculus in their first freshman semester, can attend Alamo Colleges for a pre-summer or even a pre-fall semester to work on their math level before joining the program.

TATE is looking for new students and on July 9 will hold a virtual information session from 3 pm to 5 pm. To attend the session, go to this link.

To learn more about the program and its requirements, which includes being calculus ready, visit the NVC website at https://www.alamo.edu/nvc/academics/tate/