Northwest Vista Singers Snag Wins at South Texas Competition

National Association of Teachers of Singing (NATS) South Texas Chapter Spring Audition was very successful for Northwest Vista College on April 6 at Del Mar College in Corpus Christi.

Ten singers from Northwest Vista College competed against singers from colleges and universities in our chapter. NVC was recognized with four finalists and one semi-finalist:

  • Hector Tobar and Luis Gonzalez in Second Year College Men (Classical Division)
  • Lorena Del Angel and Ana Delaney in Upper College Musical Theater Women, and
  • Natalia Jasso in First Year College Women (Classical Division) as a semi-finalist.

NVC Instructor Dr. Minkyung Lee said “I am very thrilled to share this wonderful news with Northwest Vista College, and it’s such a great honor to be recognized myself as a teacher for these outstanding singers. I am so proud of all their hard work and amazing attitudes to support each other and special bonding to be proud of singers who represented Northwest Vista College.”Congratulations to all winners and participants:

  • Luis Gonzalez – 1st Place in Second Year College Men (Classical Division)
  • Ana Delaney – 1st Place in Upper College Musical Theater Women
  • Hector Tobar – 3rd Place in Second Year College Men (Classical Division)
  • Lorena Del Angel – 3rd Place in Upper College Musical Theater Women
  • Natalia Jasso – Semi-finalist in First Year College Women (Classical Division)
  • Serena Hernandez, Thalia Moreno, Kristin DeGennaro, Ashley Rodriguez, Elizabeth Potts were also recognized with high scores and only a few points away from being semi-finalists.
Dr. Lee added that “this incredibly fine day of singing couldn’t have happen without the following supporters: Special thanks to our amazing pianist, Bogum Park from the University of Texas at Austin for her fabulous performance on the piano to add artistic touchups for beautiful performances with the NVC singers. Also, we are very thankful to NVC Music Coordinator, Daniel Smith and Chair of FAPK, Karla Ellis, for a great deal of support and encouragement during this audition preparation.

NVC Psychology Students Present Original Research in New Mexico

More than a dozen current and former Northwest Vista College psychology students, along with NVC psychology faculty, Anna-Marie Evans, Jen Fox, and Don Lucas attended the annual meeting of the Southwestern Psychological Association (SWPA) from April 5-7 in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Established in 1953, SWPA represents American Psychological Association members living in Arizona, Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and Texas. SWPA promotes and strengthens psychology’s scientific, professional and educational facets.

In addition to attending workshops, invited talks, research symposia, poster sessions, and research paper sessions — several students presented their original research to standing-room-only audiences!

Kiana Kelley, Diane Goguen, Tailar Matthews, and Kristelle Cefre presented their research titled, “Dispelling Sexual Myths with Higher and Virtual Education.”

Areayla Jeanpierre, Valerie Ortiz, and Marin McDaniel presented their research titled, “What is Your Sex IQ?”

Maimoona Palwala, Chris Lowell, and Kristina Martinez presented their research titled, “Sexual Language is implicitly More Offensive to Females than Males.”

Ethan Berry, Christian Salazar, Jacqueline Tucker, and Jacqueline Dominguez presented their research titled, “Does Childhood Adversity Affect Overall Well-Being?”

Summaries of their research can be found at:

https://www.xcdsystem.com/swpsych/program/hZV1oUP/index.cfm

Additionally, during the SWPA award ceremonies, Ethan Berry received national recognition from the American Psychological Association and was awarded for his services in the Northwest Vista College chapter of Psi Beta.

Several students have on-going research projects they plan to present at next year’s annual meet of the SWPA, which will be in Frisco, Texas.

 

Vista Students Aim to Collect Most Items for Food Drive

Northwest Vista College nutrition students are hosting a food drive on campus. Jo Ann Gonzalez’s students are working on a service project with the Guadalupe Community Center and the students chose to also participate in the 40 Cans for Lent Food Drive.

Last year, the class collected 550 pounds of food which was the second most food collected among local universities such as UTSA, OLLU, St. Mary’s (1st), and UIW. Gonzalez, NVC assistant professor of Biology, said she’s hoping the campus community can spread the word and make donations. She has a bin in her office in Live Oak, 306Q and will also have one set up at the NVC Science Festival on April 2-3.

  • 11.8% (15 million) of US households were food insecure during 2017.  (Source: Economic Research Service/USDA data)
  • Texas is ranked 2nd in the nation for food insecurity (Source: San Antonio Food Bank)
  • The cost of a meal is $2.46 however SNAP benefits cover $1.27 (48.4% not covered). (Source: https://www.feedingtexas.org/zip/78207/)
  • Many food insecure households are considered the  “working poor” in which at least one adult works, but after monthly expenses are paid there is little money left to feed everyone in the family adequately. According to the San Antonio Food Bank, 46% of their clients work.

Living on the Road and Studying

I decided to take online classes since I am constantly on the move. You see, my husband and I decided to travel cross country via RV once our youngest daughter got into college. Once we moved her into her dorm, we packed up and put the house up for sale.

We are now full timers in our RV. I am enjoying all of the sightseeing. However, with us being on the road it is impossible for me to find temporary employment or attend classes on campus. My professional background is in the medical field. Since these positions aren’t easy to get into, especially for short term, I decided to look into something else.

There are many job opportunities that you can do online but there are many scams as well. I have come across many people that work online doing virtual assistant, blogging, social media management, websites, data entry, and much more. Unfortunately, these are areas I’m not too familiar with so my only option was to look into a degree plan that would allow me to study while on the road to be able to achieve a career with my current lifestyle.

This is my second semester taking all online classes. It can be very stressful and challenging at times. Living on the road in the RV, you have to make certain that you have good internet service, but prepared to hit a lot of dead spots. You definitely need to have a time management plan. Believe me, it is very easy to fall off track. This is something you have to train yourself on and stick to it.

Make it a habit to check on announcements, emails, and assignments daily. It was always my belief that all assignments were due on Sundays by midnight but that is not that case. Checking these sites daily will help you stay on top of your courses throughout the semester.

Also, if you have any questions or simply need clarification on assignments, you should contact your professor as soon as possible. They are there to help you, you just need to reach out.

By NVC Student Connie Miller

 

Studying Tips and Living Away from Home

I have been attending college for about two years, and this is my first semester that I am taking courses for my degree. In the beginning of my college career, core classes were very easy to me. I could easily finish assignments and get good grades, which I though would be impossible with me living out of the house and having to work full time.

Now that I am starting to take courses for my degree, there is a noticeably different difficulty level to them. With a higher difficulty there is more time consumption attached, which is kind of hard due to the limited time I already have. But over these two years of living out of the house and attending college, I have picked up a few tips and tricks. When I first moved out, my roommate always had people over and I had too many distractions while trying to complete my homework and projects. I found that my room was a great quite and safe space from all of the distractions happening on the outside. Another thing I learned quickly was that finishing my school work first was more important than hanging out and working, this led to me finishing my work early in the week so I had more free time throughout the rest of the week. Putting your school work as your top priority really helps out in the long run so you do not have to rush in the end.

Learning to study was also another great trick I figured out. Previously in grade school, I never studied for anything, I just went with the punches. Studying became important when I entered college because I knew that I wanted to keep a good GPA. Unlike high school, I found that studying, even though it may be boring, really helped out in the long run. Studying kept the stress off while taking a test, and even made class work easier at times. There are a lot of tricks and tips to learn in college, and I hope these few help.

By NVC Student Ethan Wise

What I Learned From My First Semester

My first semester was a wonderful experience, I liked the college lifestyle better than high school. Even though in college you get more freedom, you do have more responsibilities, and one of those responsibilities are your classes. After completing my first semester, I had to make a change. So I learned a few things:

Do Not Procrastinate

I would always do this in high school, although it did not affect me until I got to my first semester of college. Procrastinating affected my grades and the way I performed on my work. For me, if I procrastinated, I would not really learn anything about the subject that the work was going over. When you focus on finishing as fast as you can, you do not really grasp all of the information. When you take your time and you do not have to worry about turning in your work that same night, you tend to learn more about the subject. I have also experienced I produce better quality of work when I am not procrastinating, like doing an essay, you have time to review and correct any mistakes.

Here is a link to an article of how to get over procrastination: https://student-cribs.com/en/blog/66/8-Ways-to-Stop-Procrastinating-and-Start-Studying/

Manage Your Time

This is an important topic because in college you do not only worry about school. You need time for studying, working out, resting, school, and social life. Make a schedule in which you can work with because if you do not, your school and life will get mixed up. Plus, having a routine will help you mentally. So this semester, try to write or type your schedule.

Study

I was never good at this, because I always procrastinated. If this is your first semester, study everything you learn because it really helps you pass those quizzes or exams. In my first semester, I had General Psychology, which is a very fascinating subject. I did not study to prepare for the exams, and on exam day I was confused. There was only one time that I did study for the exam, and as a result, I did way more better than my first time.

Here is a link to a video that will really motivate you to study: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=74nGnjFFapo

Set Reminders

For some of us, we have many things to think about, and we forget that the homework assigned two days ago is due at night. I have learned from my first semester to always set reminders to do the homework. So now every time a professor tells my class that there is an assignment, I type it on my phone, and set it to remind me as I arrive home. There is also a feature on Canvas that can notify you of any assignments.

By NVC Student Hector Padron

Setting Goals for the New Semester

As often as I tell myself to make sure I set at least one goal for the new year or the beginning of each semester, I always tend to fail.

Which is ironic, because I refuse to set goals out of my fear of not achieving them. I think this is a common obstacle I can share with a lot of other students. This year I want to challenge myself to set more than one goal, and understand that it is okay if I don’t accomplish them. What matters is that I had the intention of achieving my goals in the first place.

I have three simple goals

  1. Ask more questions
  2. Learn instead of memorize
  3. Better time management 

I think the importance of setting goals is to allow yourself to overcome an obstacle. Whether your obstacle may be procrastination, bad grades or fear; fear of failure or fear of stepping out your comfort zone. 

When writing down my goals, I kept them doable and made sure they would better me as a person. I’m hoping to eventually utilize said goals throughout the rest of my education journey and in my future career. 

I encourage you to set goals for this semester, and know that it’s okay not to achieve the goals in their entirety. Continuously working towards them and getting close to achieving them is important and valid. 

By NVC Student Haneen Rafati

Digital Video Students Help Nonprofits

For the Fall 2018 semester, Northwest Vista College Digital Video & Cinema Production had two sections of  Advanced Digital Video classes. 

Eight nonprofit client projects were produced by students. These videos were recently screened for clients on Dec. 13. 

Since these video projects began more than 10 years ago, DVCP students have saved the nonprofit community over a half million dollars in video production fees. 

  • M.A.D.D. PSA.  Mothers Against Drunk Driving draw attention to the fact that the San Antonio community has lost loved ones who once treasured San Antonio. Their mission is to end drunk driving, help fight drugged driving, support victims of these violent crimes and prevent underage drinking.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QHi6O–7PN4
  • Center for Refugee Services. The CRS is San Antonio’s only registered, independent nonprofit organization dedicated to providing a range of health, educational and family services to help resettled refugees become successful independent members of our community. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MXcpFG7dAnM
  • House of Neighborly Services. This five-minute feature provides insight on HNS’s senior health program and how its gatherings, events and programs help to better the lives of seniors on San Antonio’s west side.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VIQkIxIHFtA
  • NVC Campaign for Art. Launched in August 2018 this is an effort to bring more permanent art to NVC through an endowment fund. The video features comments from the art department faculty on the cultural and educational inspiration of the NVC art program. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LHb-4Y87Qf4&t=101s
  • PEARLS Foundation. DVCP students created a “walk in our shoes” type video. It includes mentoring moments with teen girls who have been in foster care and are about to age out of the system. PEARLS Court is a joint project of the Bexar County Civil District Courts and Children’s Court. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MmDs-E9pTkE
  • Children’s Chorus of San Antonio. “Boys to Men” is a new initiative of CCSA engaging young men ages 10 to 18 in the power of music and community. Groups from across San Antonio are featured in a public concert at the Tobin Center for the Performing Arts. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ijEMoW5ukko
  • San Antonio Food Bank. This video features a new Hope to Home delivery program for seniors. The program seeks to address the unmet nutritional needs of homebound seniors in the San Antonio area. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rHJ71_OkkDk
  • NVC Vista Central. The NVC Welcome Center video is intended to be used as a marketing tool and will be shown to prospective students at New Student Orientations. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l0lBAAVcCow

Stuck in the Middle: Life as a Non-Degree Seeking Student

A few months before graduating high school, I was forced to face a tough reality: If I didn’t get at least 80 percent of my college costs covered, I would not be attending a university.

My parents, as hard as they work, were not in a position to contribute anything financially to my education. I was in the same boat as many students today are because I knew, at 17 years old, that I’d have to take on this responsibility fully on my own. Luckily, I received four different scholarships, one of which was a full academic scholarship to attend UTSA. Of course, I accepted.

I graduated in May of 2018 with a degree in Public Health with a concentration in Epidemiology and Disease Control and a Minor in Biology. As much as I am the the type of person that needs to have things in order, it was really hard for me to face the fact that, just months before graduating, I didn’t want to become a doctor anymore. Panic struck as I began feeling that I just wasted four years of my life and a full scholarship on a subject I was now completely disinterested in.

My brain told me for so long to pursue a career that I and my family would be proud of, without listening to my heart and what I actually wanted to do. With true friends, I stopped procrastinating and looked into programs that would help me change paths. Today, I am a non-degree seeking student a Northwest Vista pursuing a career in Communications.

At one point, this felt like a huge step backwards for me. After all, I had just gotten my degree and now I would be back at a community college taking introductory classes at the same level as high school graduates. On top of that, I would get no financial aid because of my classification. It was really difficult feeling like I was behind compared to my peers. Eventually, I stopped feeling sorry for myself, paid for my classes, applied for jobs I could learn in, and got hired (somehow) for a position that I don’t even think I was qualified for yet.

To sum up my experiences, I’ve learned that 1) As long as you’re working towards something, you’re never behind. 2) If you love what you study, you won’t regret your degree. 3) Take chances applying for jobs, even if you feel you’re not qualified yet.

By NVC Student Jasmine Valadez

Let Your Advisor Help with Bumps in the Road

Going back to school was one of the smartest decisions I’ve made as an adult. These days, there aren’t many well-paying jobs out there that do not require a degree or specialized training of some sort.

However, life tends to throw curve balls at our plans for a better life. Not to deter us from our path but to prove to us how much gumption we have to achieve our goals; even if that means taking a break again.

This semester, life threw one of its curve balls at me. I found out towards the beginning of the fall semester that I was pregnant. Even with a rocky beginning to this pregnancy, and some professors who gave me more than enough leniency than I imagined, I persevered through.  Now, I have an even bigger decision on my hands. I already have two older children and now I’m adding a third into the mix. Did I want to add school work on top of learning how to adjust to life with two kids and a newborn? Would I have the time I needed to devote to school? I have so many questions flowing through my head and absolutely no answers. So where does that leave me?

I made an appointment with my advisor to go over the logistics of taking a break from school, but the one question was, how long of a break I needed to take is a question only I can answer. I know I won’t lose my credits I’ve earned or the grades I’ve received but I’m afraid I might lose some of the gumption I have to complete school. For now, I plan on only taking two semesters off to give me time to adjust to the new direction life is taking me and I feel like that is enough. I’m just hoping that when the time comes to re-enroll, I won’t have anymore curve balls thrown my way for a while!

As with any concerns about school, go talk to your advisor or any of the ones available. They’ve seen and heard just about every situation and know how to help you fit school around the bumps in the road.

By NVC Student Jessica Longoria